Why We Train: Dreams and Aspirations

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Why We Train: Dreams and Aspirations

The "Why We Train" series will showcase and highlight individuals at Fulcrum Training Hall.

Strength matters in the pursuit of excellence at any chosen task. Daveon Collins,  a sprinter with Seattle Speed, began a serious strength training program in mid-2014. Since then he has taken his best squat from 40 kg (88 pounds) to 180 kg (396 pounds). An incredibly self-sufficient and hard working individual, Daveon’s success in the gym is mirrored on the track, where it counts the most. Shown here is a commanding win in the 60 meter dash at his most recent indoor track meet. His ultimate goal is to represent the US in outdoor track and field in this summer's Olympic Games in Brazil. With continued perseverance, he is well positioned to make that dream a reality.

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Why We Train: Caring for Self and Others

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Why We Train: Caring for Self and Others

The "Why We Train" series will showcase and highlight individuals at Fulcrum Training Hall.

                     

                  

Kay began training in August 2015 at the age of 64. At that time, she could press six grams and struggled to squat her own body weight through a full range of motion. Not unlike many people her age, she found walking difficult and suffered from debilitating back pain, plantar fasciitis, and arthritis. Five months later Kay is able to press 11 kilos for multiple sets of five, and squat 30 kilos for three repetitions.  
As her physical capacity improves, Kay finds that she can truly embrace her role as a caregiver. Kay loves animals of all kinds, her three cats in particular, and also serves as caregiver to her 95 year old mother. Simple but critical activities like helping her mother out of the car, or carrying large bags of cat food, used to be all but impossible for Kay. Now she performs these tasks more easily and more independently than before.
Kay reports that her mental state has changed as a result of physical training. Her outlook on life, emotional well-being, and ability to cope with loss and hardship are noticeably improved. Previously someone who dreaded exercise, Kay looks forward to her bi-weekly training sessions because of the fun, positive, animal-friendly atmosphere. She appears brighter, more energetic, and happier overall. She has expanded her knowledge of what a healthy diet entails and learned how to fuel her body so that it can keep up with her busy, independent lifestyle.
The ability of barbell training to improve the human condition by affecting multiple facets of a person’s daily life is incredibly exciting. Instead of medicating people for conditions associated with an aging body, what if we chose to slow the aging process through natural means, rather than mask the symptoms? Kay has chosen to do just that. Strength matters when you are responsible not only for yourself, but for other beings. Caring for others is a significant piece of Kay’s life - and her ability to help others has improved as a result of an increased ability to help herself.

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Why We Train: Health and Longevity

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Why We Train: Health and Longevity

The "Why We Train" series will showcase and highlight individuals at Fulcrum Training Hall.

         Peter is a regular client who brings a positive energy and enthusiasm to our morning sessions. Peter has made remarkable transformations in his time at Fulcrum, not only in terms of strength and body composition, but in his attitude towards his own health. At the age of 55, he had difficulty lowering his center of mass through a full range of motion (squat with no external resistance) and three years later squats an amazing 85 kilos (187 pounds).  Strength acquisition improves the quality of life of individuals in this demographic by warding off the supposedly-inevitable-effects-of-aging through natural means. Training with barbells improves bone density, balance, brain function, well being, and the quality of tissue of all the underlying biological systems that we are bound to in this time of our existence. Another strong case for strength training is to maintain or reclaim our independence of living.  Our gym environment provides a space for humans to take charge of their own health. Peter is a great example of why strength matters at all stages of life.

 

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Why we train: speed, strength and explosive power

Why we train: speed, strength and explosive power

The "Why We Train" series will showcase and highlight individuals at Fulcrum Training Hall.

 Seattle Speed warms up for an afternoon training session. 

 Seattle Speed warms up for an afternoon training session. 

This talented group of athletes are some of the fastest track and field competitors in the country. Their dedication to their chosen sport is an inspiration to those who train around them. Barbell training supports every human, and when placed in the hands of an elite competitor can take them to the next level. Olympic weightlifting in particular is a highly metabolically specific form of training for any sport that demands a high level of speed or agility. Strength matters, especially when pushing your physical limits as a competitive athlete.